Image: Vicki-Laine Green, Jeanette James and Lillian Wheatley with traditional and contemporary necklaces that were for sale at the DAAF. Photo: Jillian Mundy

10-Aug-2018 - 12-Aug-2018

WaPa: Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair

In August, the walantanalinany palingina (WaPa) program supported the first Tasmanian Aboriginal artists to present their work at the Darwin Aboriginal Art Fair (DAAF). DAAF has a reputation as being one of Australia’s most significant and internationally recognised arts events. The fair showcases a spectacular diversity of artwork that connects both new and seasoned audiences directly with Indigenous artists.

Unlike our mainland counterparts, Tasmania only has a handful of Aboriginal artist who are recognised nationally or internationally.

Curator Tony Brown speaks to the significant opportunity created for Tasmanian Aboriginal artists through this historically significant representation.

With Tasmania being part of the 2018 DAAF it opened up a whole new world for our artists. Initially their works were only seen at a local and national level, they are now seen globally. This is so important to our artists to be invited to the DAAF. It now gives them the recognition they so rightly deserve. It opens up many new and exciting opportunities for them as artists to have their works on display in the biggest Aboriginal art fair in Australia.

DAAF also created the opportunity for emerging artists to learn from senior practitioners ensuring the transmission of cultural knowledge and strengthening of cultural traditions.

Our Tasmania Aboriginal artists have such a wide and varied range of artistic practises, ranging from shell necklace making, basket weaving, woodwork, jewellery and painting to name a few. This however would not have happened if it were not for a small number of our elders, both past and present to pass their skills on to the next generation of artists. What I find most pleasing is our artists are finding and exploring different ways of incorporating our shells and rock engraving symbols into their artwork. Tasmanian Aboriginal artists are now creating and paving the way for our next generation of artists.

walantanalinany palingina (country all around: welcome) and the DAAF Project was generously supported by the Alcorso Foundation, Arts Tasmania’s Artsbridge program, the Australia Council for the Arts Chosen initiative and Contemporary Art Tasmania.

 

 

                          


 

Vicki-Laine Green, Jeanette James and Lillian Wheatley with traditional and contemporary necklaces that were for sale at the DAAF. Photo: Jillian MundayTwined Baskets, Colleen Munday. Photo: Jillian MundayWork by palawa jeweller Andrew Gall. Photo: Jillian Munday.

 

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