Image: Kate Murphy, PonySkate, 2004, still from video, courtesy the artist

23-Oct-2004 - 21-Nov-2004

INTERLACE

KATE MURPHY, SHAUN GLADWELL, EMIL GOH

CURATOR: BLAIR FRENCH

LOCATION: CONTEMPORARY ART TASMANIA GALLERY

CAST Gallery is pleased to present INTERLACE a Performance Space touring exhibition.

INTERLACE is an exhibition of new video installations by three of Australia’s most exciting moving image artist, curated by Associate Director of Sydney’s Performance Space, Blair French, INTERLACE was produced for inclusion in the 2004 Sydney Biennale’s Parallel Program, where it received critical acclaim and was widely reviewed.

The artists in INTERLACE treat video as a means of social representation and as an intervention, to address the ways our public and private actions are affected by a consciousness of our own self image. The performative actions of everyday life become public through mechanisms such as reality television, and return to our private lives in the form of performative living, where we can no longer separate a sense of self from a sense of how we are seen by others. The works also address how our performance in a place can mark territory, how it can disintegrate the anonymity of a space and ‘prove’ we were there.

Shaun Gladwell’s Loco Tapes is a series of five experimental video portraits in which his subjects engage with their immediate environments in various acts of speculation ranging from discussions with Mormon missionaries in a public park to a private tour of a suburban house with a strange history.

Emil Goh’s Between (Seoul) is the third in a series of city works, where he merges documentary impulses with traditions of panoramic photography and video to reveal and explore the edges of public and private spaces within a densely populated metropolis.

Kate Murphy’s PonySkate is the result of a 24 video documentation project where two children were each equipped with a camera to record a day in their lives, while the artist simultaneously filmed them in the process. The work highlights how even seven year olds know how to competently play out their lives before a camera, and explores the extent to which video has become entrenched in all our daily lives.

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